Shanina Ross

LEARN, MOVE, AND CHANGE

nuocmamca:

major, major props and appreciations to the common ground crew for inviting me out, allowing me to share my love for food, my love for stories at this month’s open mic.  a lil’ bit of what i shared:

f o o d for the s o u l.

one of the things i believe is that we live the way that we do, we engage with everything around us, and we choose to interact how we interact with the world because of what i consider “great turnings” - moments in our lives in which we may encounter a challenge, we make a decision, and there’s a shift - a turning - of energy.  these also may be “peaks and valleys” or “high and low points” in our lives.  

on those great turnings for me was when i was 18, two months before graduating high school. i had always been a husky kid and always had more to love.  i loved the junkiest of junk foods.  though while i seemed happy from the outside, i was emotionally drained in the inside.  my soul felt empty.  my doctor at the time, after doing the blood work, diagnosed me with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and told me that if i continued to eat and live the way that i did, i would live to be 30.  i found out pretty quickly that diet-related disease was in my family, in my friends, and in my community.  that day was the beginning of now my 8 year journey of understanding not just how food affects our health, but how the ills and opportunities of our health are systematic - connected to our collective understanding of power, justice and liberation.

i’ve collected many stories over the last 8 years, and i’m excited to share my love for them tonight.

chào cay trâm mốc / dear jambolan tree on spirits and “otherly” existence.  dedicated to nina, nina’s dad, and seed savers of the world.

snap. snap. snap. on oakland streets, food justice, access, and sustaining our needs.  dedicated to the activists, organizers, artists, educators, and warriors of the world.

cháo cho cháu / rice porridge for grandchildren on vietnamese fierce love, love letters to food, and healing.  dedicated to the mothers, daughters, sisters, grandmothers, and fierce food females who’ve nourished us.

the food offerings that night:

món ăn linh hồn đêm nay

xôi xoài*
với gia vi ̣được chọn riêng: mè, ̣đậu phộng, và dừa*

xôi mặn*
với gia vị: đồ chua và hành phi*
được chọn phần gà, tôm, lạp xưởng, hay chả/giò lụa

xoài tươi*
với mưới ớt

dừa tươi*

bánh mì

*món ăn chay

the evening’s soul menu

mango sticky rice*
with roasted sesame seeds, roasted peanuts, and shredded coconut as condiments

savory sticky rice*
with pickles and fried shallots*
with chicken, shrimp, cured sausage, and/or fresh banana-leaf-wrapped sausage

fresh mangoes*
with chili salt*

fresh coconuts*

bread and sandwiches

*vegan

 

pics: @commongroundoc

funksflo:

lorenzmdumuk:

 Terisa Siagatonu- “Duty”

damn this poem is so fiercely dope.

Our mothers,

They do not laugh like we do.

We do not know the shape of their teeth in good light.

(via nuocmamca)

My submission to Common Ground’s last show with the theme “Food for the Soul”, 

Laotian Noodles, Banh Canh Lao, khao piak. My mom lived in Vientiane, Laos for more than 10 years before entering refugee camp in Thailand. Through her dishes, I can better understand her life and her journey through Laos, Thailand, and the Philippines. 

 Food was my mom’s expression of love. The way she goes to the market every single day to pick the freshest ingredients, only to use the best ingredients for dinner. 
"When I was your age, I was observing chefs, that’s how I learned to cook"
"How are you going to raise a family with American food? Your children would be overweight over mac and cheese!"
My mother is the Goddess, Masterchef, Executive chef in her kitchen.
Sometimes if I sit there long enough, she would tell me stories. How she skipped 3rd grade to work at the market, fetched water from the well, grew up on bowls of porridge and peanuts. In her 20’s, she immigrated over to Laos to work for my grandma’s restaurant. Cooked nem nuong, grilled pork for 10 years and raised her siblings.
 Through these kitchen conversations, I started to realize how my own awareness of cultural diversity and senses developed as I ate my mother’s food. Food for the soul is not just sustenance, but also sustaining the mind and spirit to continue living with purpose. 

My submission to Common Ground’s last show with the theme “Food for the Soul”, 

Laotian Noodles, Banh Canh Lao, khao piak. My mom lived in Vientiane, Laos for more than 10 years before entering refugee camp in Thailand. Through her dishes, I can better understand her life and her journey through Laos, Thailand, and the Philippines. 

Food was my mom’s expression of love. The way she goes to the market every single day to pick the freshest ingredients, only to use the best ingredients for dinner. 

"When I was your age, I was observing chefs, that’s how I learned to cook"

"How are you going to raise a family with American food? Your children would be overweight over mac and cheese!"

My mother is the Goddess, Masterchef, Executive chef in her kitchen.

Sometimes if I sit there long enough, she would tell me stories. How she skipped 3rd grade to work at the market, fetched water from the well, grew up on bowls of porridge and peanuts. In her 20’s, she immigrated over to Laos to work for my grandma’s restaurant. Cooked nem nuong, grilled pork for 10 years and raised her siblings.

Through these kitchen conversations, I started to realize how my own awareness of cultural diversity and senses developed as I ate my mother’s food. Food for the soul is not just sustenance, but also sustaining the mind and spirit to continue living with purpose. 

Elli Ingram

—Poetic Justice

Poetic Justice - Elli Ingram

addicted to this cover.

(Source: letmebegreat)

The play brought back a lot of memories and suddenly I find myself missing my late grandmother #emotional #play #christmasinhanoi #kwanzainhue #ramadaninsaigon

The play brought back a lot of memories and suddenly I find myself missing my late grandmother #emotional #play #christmasinhanoi #kwanzainhue #ramadaninsaigon

Happy Lunar New Year! Chuc Mung Nam Moi! #sauriengsothom #haibatrung @xo_mnn @nuocmamca

Happy Lunar New Year! Chuc Mung Nam Moi! #sauriengsothom #haibatrung @xo_mnn @nuocmamca

Người Việt, Đồng Tính, và Không Sơ // Viet, Queer, & Unafraid

nuocmamca:

What’s goin’ down this Sunday.

As of 11am this morning from GM:

“Dear friends and allies,



Here is the update. 

There will most likely be a protest at the Tet Parade this Sunday, February 10th. I don’t see why the Tet Parade Organizers would change their mind. 


You can read a summary of it at the following website:
http://bolsavik.com/2013/02/against-tradition-lgbt-viets-excluded-from-tet-parade/



We plan to show up to the early part the parade to protest and be there for the duration of the parade. We would like to mobilize 300 people to show up near the stage with signs.

Please get friends to come out to support yet another historic event to SAY NO TO DISCRIMINATION AND EXCLUSION. We will let our presence be known.



Our tentative plan:
 Join us at 8:30 am on Sunday, February 10th, at the Phuoc Loc Tho statues across from the stage for the parade announcers. Here is a list of things you can do to help.

Wear yellow tshirts so we can identify each other more easily.

Bring home-made signs. We have made a few suggestions and will come up with new ones (https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8AFtYtLSD3GMmlqMVBFS3BNd2c/edit?usp=sharing). We don’t want this to be too negative as it is Tet. But firm statements about our values of inclusiveness and nondiscrimination are good to stress.

1) Get the words out to let friends and allies know to join us on Sunday at 8:30 am at the Phuoc Loc Tho statues.

2) Show up with friends. We need lots of people to be out. ~300. We have only managed about 100+ in the past. Let’s triple the effort and let our voice of inclusiveness be known. 


3) If you have organizing and/or security skills and have bull horns to help direct traffic, please contact me personally so we can create teams of people for security and crowd-directing.



4) We need rainbow flags that people can carry to show solidarity. We also need a big rainbow flag to head the march toward the festival. Anyone who can provide these, please let me know how many you have and bring them to the parade meeting spot.



5) Any theater or performance artist who wants to help us with flash mob dance? Maybe we can do gangnam style dance and music but call it Little Saigon Style. Any lyric writer to change the wordings? Perhaps we can do this right before the parade to garner attention. Anyone interested in this, please let me know. We will need boomboxes if we are going to do this. 



6) UVSA members who have access to the schedule of the parade, please share your information. Carrying signs and making statements to let the organizers know that you do not support discrimination of anyone in the Viet community will be helpful.



7) Those who are in the parade can also show solidarity by carrying a small rainbow flag or sign saying words like “Bình đẳng cho mọi người” (equality for all) and preferably in rainbow color.



8) We also circulate a new petition about wanting inclusiveness practice by the Tet parade organizers. It is in Vietnamese. If someone has time, please help translate it and so other can sign it.

https://www.change.org/petitions/xin-ký-tên-ủng-hộ-người-đồng-t%C3%ADnh-song-t%C3%ADnh-và-chuyển-đổi-giới-t%C3%ADnh-người-mỹ-gốc-việt-tham-gia-diễn-hành-tết?utm_campaign=friend_inviter_chat&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition&utm_term=permissions_dialog_true



9) Any other advices and help are welcome.

The main organizers are working tirelessly and have not had time to update us about the legal actions they are taking and the petitions they are creating. While I don’t like the direction of lawsuits, I do want to show solidarity and will show up to the parade to protest discrimination.



Thank you for your help on what to be another historic event!



-GM

Those who may not be there on Sunday, but want to show solidarity:

1)  Sign our online petition that has received over 1,200 signatures in a matter of two days asking the Tet Parade Organizing Board to stop discriminating LGBT folks from participating in the parade: http://chn.ge/UQSA0g

2)  Send this to your friends, family, homies, boos, etc. in Orange County and beyond.

3)  Want to show your support in pictures and/or videos?  Make a sign, share your story, etc.  Tag #vunicorns :)


On a personal note, my parents are in Việt Nam.  They’ve been there for two weeks now, back in a week.  They haven’t reached out to me since my last letter to them before they left.  I shared with them my well wishes, my offerings to family there, and how I want to continue redefining my relationship to them as their child if they continue to discriminate against me.

I’m not willing to continue perpetuating oppression, saving face, patriarchy, and systems of oppression.  While I’m not perfect and and I’m checking my privileges, I’ve committed to practicing healing, dismantling oppression, and love.  Vietnamese and communities of color have been oppressed for the longest times, but I can’t accept our own people doing it to ourselves and anyone, to that matter.

I’ll be thinking of my parents on Sunday, I’m sure.  They may not be there there with me this time, but I hope to they’ll be with me in solidarity in the near future.  I know they’ll always be with me in spirit, but I don’t know how for long in this lifetime.

I know they can love.  They’ve told me that they love me, even if it was just recently.  It matters to me that I heard that, that I know that.  How that love manifests, how that love shows - that’s still a discussion and journey of exploration.

‘Til then, I will offer my parents bánh tét that I helped make in community of friends to honor our family, friends, ancestors and bring in prosperity to the Lunar New Year of the Snake.

To #vunicorns!

funksflo:

tet2012:


377/384
Mini Market



lunar new year
1) there is nothing more frightening than the possibility of everything.
2) it’s time for a new year, a trashing of old bones, a clearing out of old news.
3) i have been thinking about the abandonment of a home.  i cannot see any faces here nor there.
4) it’s time for a new year, time to return to my self.
5) there is nothing more liberating than the possibility of everything.

funksflo:

tet2012:

377/384

Mini Market

lunar new year

1) there is nothing more frightening than the possibility of everything.

2) it’s time for a new year, a trashing of old bones, a clearing out of old news.

3) i have been thinking about the abandonment of a home.  i cannot see any faces here nor there.

4) it’s time for a new year, time to return to my self.

5) there is nothing more liberating than the possibility of everything.

The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours. It is an amazing journey, and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins.

—Bob Moawad (via sorakeem)

(Source: kari-shma, via stopithenry)

Because if you pay close attention to Beyonce (and if you are hating on her you are), she kind of is singing about some pretty OK stuff. It is very important to learn how to kick dumb dudes who mistreat you to the left, to the left. And if you can get past the Uh oh’s uh oh’s uh oh no no no’s, she is very clearly about empowering women to embrace who they are and be who they want to be. And I thought that’s what all this damn feminism, womanism, and general lifeism thing was all about, anyway?