Shanina Ross

LEARN, MOVE, AND CHANGE

sinidentidades:

Touching Photographs From a Thai Artist Reconciling Displacement

Pimprae Hiranprueck, who goes by Nancy, barely spoke English when she left Thailand for the U.S. at age 13. And while she now calls the U.S. home, for many years, she’s struggled to reconcile missing her home country and the family she left behind. As a way of coping and investigating the layers of emotions she felt about her estrangement and her imminent return to Thailand, she produced Intersecting the Parallels, a photography project where she inserts herself into landscapes and family photographs. In a recent interview in SlateHiranprueck says the project enabled her to, “reacquaint myself with friends and family and to create new memories.” Read more on her website

Read more at Slate

(via joxnofarc)

rainydaysandblankets:

Running For Cover // Ivan And Alyosha

we’ve been trying with each other to unravel the age old story, but i’m starting to think there’s a reason that we don’t understand.

(Source: kvtes)

Common Ground

A late post but I looked back at my drafts today and found this quote I had saved to publish. There’s still so much I have to read and learn about Nelson Mandela, but at one moment in my life, this quote meant so much to me as I was struggling to make peace with all the frustrations I had regarding race, hate, discrimination and violence. rest in peace Nelson Mandela. 

It was during those long and lonely years that my hunger for the freedom of my own people became a hunger for the freedom of all people, black and white. I knew as well as I knew anything that the oppressors must be liberated just as surely as the oppressed. A man who takes away a man’s freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind bars of prejudice…both are robbed of their humanity. 

Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela; Nelson Mandela. Back Bay Book 

Lianne La Havas

—Lost & Found

apartmentsounds:

Lianne La Havas || Lost & Found

Cup of Earl Grey Latte with Soy in hand and Lianne La Havas singing in my ear.

Personal Statement…I can get through this. 

dontbuymiss-saigon:

I am a Vietnamese/American womyn.  This is my truth: The U.S. military is responsible for trauma in our community. It’s involvement in other countries is more oppressive than liberatory. My family struggles to stay together and stay connected as a result of this history. The U.S. didn’t do us a favor and neither does Miss Saigon in its misrepresentation of the truth and misogynistic portrayal of women. -Phuong

dontbuymiss-saigon:

I am a Vietnamese/American womyn.  This is my truth: The U.S. military is responsible for trauma in our community. It’s involvement in other countries is more oppressive than liberatory. My family struggles to stay together and stay connected as a result of this history. The U.S. didn’t do us a favor and neither does Miss Saigon in its misrepresentation of the truth and misogynistic portrayal of women.
-Phuong

(via funksflo)

marielikestodraw:

inthewinterigrowantlers:

tweedle-dipshit:

americanninjax:

kendra-p:

Today I developed a newfound appreciation for the elliptical

This is EXACTLY how I used the elliptical this morning lol.

I just showed this to my roommate and without saying anything to each other first, we got super excited and shouted that we need to go elliptical together from now on and sync our movements neural handshake style.

Yes, finally some motivation to get on the elliptical…

LAUGHING

marielikestodraw:

inthewinterigrowantlers:

tweedle-dipshit:

americanninjax:

kendra-p:

Today I developed a newfound appreciation for the elliptical

This is EXACTLY how I used the elliptical this morning lol.

I just showed this to my roommate and without saying anything to each other first, we got super excited and shouted that we need to go elliptical together from now on and sync our movements neural handshake style.

Yes, finally some motivation to get on the elliptical…

LAUGHING

(via hollowgrowl)

Online activism changed me from a woman who actively put down other women to one who actively uplifts them. Online activism changed me from a white woman with unchecked privilege who actively oppressed people of color to a woman who has lost friends because she tells them to shut their racist mouths. Online activism has changed me from a woman who hated her body, to a woman who realizes just how beautiful she is. No one EVER tell me online activism isn’t good for anything.

sazziscooler

The above quote though. My gut reaction is to cringe at the phrase “online activism” but when you really think about it everything these online communities provide — free information/literature sharing, community building, consciousness raising, and the free exchange of ideas and critiques are all (more within the self, more passive) forms of activism.

One of my favorite rebuttals of some asshat saying the usual “SJ blogs don’t even do anything because it’s not in real life” was when someone said "If it wasn’t for online activism, I’d still be calling women sluts and whores."

Early on in high school, I would slut shame, make racist jokes, etc. And now I’m a sociology major and I go to a women’s college and constantly read/think/write about intersectional feminism. So fuck anyone who thinks online social justice conversations and blogs don’t “do anything.”

(via beyonced)

Tumblr connected me to a wealth of knowledge but more importantly the stories of others that I otherwise would never have heard because of structural barriers

(via baritonepats)

(Source: aquieterrioter, via buzzlightyearsu)

We all want to be good allies. We all want, so desperately, to do the right thing—above all, to be useful. I just want to put forth that being an effective community worker and a good ally is most effective when we work from within our own communities—with nuance, with intention, and with love. If we instead give in to our ego, if we instead insist on being the ‘exceptional’ Asian activist and participate in divide-and-conquer, where we point fingers at our own communities from outside of it and say we wish Asians were more radical, why can’t Asians be more down for the cause like us—if we indulge our self-righteousness rather than work from a place of love and nuance – we are not effective, to our own people or anyone else. Community activism isn’t a competition—it is above all an act of love. Peace.

survivalofthephittest:

I was a huge Power Ranger fan growing up and being a bit biased, I always liked the Yellow Ranger. (And of course the white ranger, he was so cool lol) I didn’t know much about her off the TV screen but this video really inspired me because she went through what so many of my people had to go through, to eventually living her dream of being an actress. Judging from this video she seemed like such a positive and strong willed individual. It’s unfortunate that she lost her life so young. Rest in peace Thuy Trang, you’re definitely an inspiration.

OMG She was my hero too! also Pink Ranger..

(Source: jadegodhands, via freelasoul)

fuckyeahladies-fictionalandreal:

Holy shit, seriously, let’s talk about Susie fucking Carmichael right now. Susie is a strong, smart, talented fucking freedom fighter. She doesn’t let Angelica lord her white-privilege and her ageist bullshit over her, and she empowers others to stand up for themselves as well. She gets what being a leader means at the age of, like, fucking four. She alternates between putting Angelica in her place and genuinely trying to be her friend, which makes her a bigger fucking person than most adults on the planet. Despite being in a position with a fuckton of power over her friends, she is fair and accepting and allows Angelica to realize her own bullshit instead of just telling everyone to ostracize her ass. This is how you fucking create allies.
Susie runs around, gets dirty, pretends to be a doctor, tap dances, speaks fucking French, sings, competes, and is just a straight-up clever as shit woman of color. And she does all this in a yellow dress with frilly-ass socks. Bad ass.

fuckyeahladies-fictionalandreal:

Holy shit, seriously, let’s talk about Susie fucking Carmichael right now. Susie is a strong, smart, talented fucking freedom fighter. She doesn’t let Angelica lord her white-privilege and her ageist bullshit over her, and she empowers others to stand up for themselves as well. She gets what being a leader means at the age of, like, fucking four. She alternates between putting Angelica in her place and genuinely trying to be her friend, which makes her a bigger fucking person than most adults on the planet. Despite being in a position with a fuckton of power over her friends, she is fair and accepting and allows Angelica to realize her own bullshit instead of just telling everyone to ostracize her ass. This is how you fucking create allies.

Susie runs around, gets dirty, pretends to be a doctor, tap dances, speaks fucking French, sings, competes, and is just a straight-up clever as shit woman of color. And she does all this in a yellow dress with frilly-ass socks. Bad ass.

(Source: , via jayduhhh)

A Village Called Versaille, New Orleans East

Not all toxic people are cruel and uncaring. Some of them love us dearly. Many of them have good intentions. Most are toxic to our being simply because their needs and way of existing in the world force us to compromise ourselves and our happiness. They aren’t inherently bad people, but they aren’t the right people for us. And as hard as it is, we have to let them go. Life is hard enough without being around people who bring you down, and as much as you care, you can’t destroy yourself for the sake of someone else. You have to make your wellbeing a priority. Whether that means breaking up with someone you care about, loving a family member from a distance, letting go of a friend, or removing yourself from a situation that feels painful — you have every right to leave and create a safer space for yourself.

—Daniell Koepke (via spitswap)

(Source: internal-acceptance-movement, via titotito)